Most home upgrades don’t actually make you more money on your home sale, but they can decrease your selling price if the new homeowner will have to buy replacements. In fact, may home warranties include appliance coverage because a person moving into a move-in ready home does not expect to replace appliances for the first year or so.

When people walk into a home with new stainless steel appliances, it is a major selling point. The person can envision their own food in the fridge, and they fondly picture themselves doing household chores like cooking or loading the dishwasher. A dated, cream-colored set of appliances does not have the same effect.

You don’t have to replace all of your appliances in order to sell a home, but it may affect how well the sale goes. Here are some considerations.

Replace as Needed

Many people make do with appliances that have broken functions but work generally well. They may have to use pliers to get the dishwasher to turn on, but the dishes turn out as clean as if they had a new dishwasher. This is not appropriate. One of the saddest reasons to buy new appliances is for someone else to use them. When your appliance starts breaking down, replace it with something that will be pleasing to the next homeowner. This way, you will get to enjoy a new appliance, and it won’t be an issue when selling.

Lower the Price of Your Home

If your appliances work but are outdated, note that you are reducing the cost in order to cover the cost of these upgrades. This can be a selling point for home buyers because they can save money during the move, but they are still moving into a functioning home.

Don’t Buy Luxury

If you are going to be using the appliances and feel like you need luxury, then go ahead and do it. If you are doing it to attract home buyers, it is not worth the expense. Not only may you opt for something that the homeowner wants to replace anyway, but you spend a large amount of money on something that doesn’t increase the value of the home. Don’t buy the bottom of the barrel appliances, and stick to quality levels that coincide with the price level of the home.

It’s tempting to deck out your home in order to get it to sell fast, but you won’t benefit from this expenditure unless you do it responsibly.